Your Prescription

Glasses

How do I get a copy of my prescription?

Following an eye test, the optician is legally obliged to provide you with a copy of your prescription.

How recent does my prescription have to be?

Your prescription must be no older than two years. Your recommended intervals between eye tests vary depending on your age and health. 

Understanding your prescription

  1. The first field is for the ‘Spherical’ number and this will show whether you are short sighted (-) or long sighted (+) in each eye. A higher number means a stronger prescription.
  2. If you have astigmatism (when the front part of the eye, the cornea, is the shape of a rugby ball instead of a regular circle), there will be a second and third number. The second number is the ‘Cylinder’ number which can be negative or positive and measures the amount of astigmatism you have.
  3. The third number is the ‘Axis’, which will be between 1 and 180. The axis number describes the curve in your eye.
  4. Sometimes you may have a muscle imbalance in your eye, so your optician will prescribe a prism and a prism base. The prism is usually written in fractions (for example 1 ½) and the prism base shows the direction of the prism in the lens (for example, IN, OUT, UP or DOWN). This is fairly uncommon so the boxes are normally empty.

Can I use my contact lens prescription to order glasses from you?

Unfortunately not. Contact lenses work differently to glasses - you will have separate eye tests for contact lenses and for glasses, so your prescriptions will vary. 

Pupillary Distance (PD) 

What is my PD?

Your PD is the distance between your eyes, measured between the centre of your pupils. For a pair of glasses to perform as well as possible for you, the lenses need to be made to match this distance between your eyes, so that the centre of each lens aligns with the centre of your pupils. This is particularly important if you have a high-strength prescription.

How do I find out what my PD is?

Usually the optician will not include this with your prescription, so you should ask your optician for your PD following your eye test. Alternatively we can take this measurement from your existing glasses - your PD doesn’t change from one prescription to the next. If you would rather not send it, we can make your glasses using an average PD measurement. However, we recommend that you provide us with an accurate PD if you can.

Why is it important that I have my PD?

Very occasionally, people with strong prescriptions and whose pupillary distance diverges significantly from the average, may experience problems with glasses made using an average PD measurement. An incorrect PD won’t harm the eyes but may cause discomfort or strain which would be noticeable upon wearing the glasses.

Is there a limit to the prescriptions you work with?

MoodOptic cannot fulfil prescription glasses or sunglasses orders to customers with eyesight in the following ranges:

  • The combined SPH and CYL is greater than +/-8.00
  • The CYL is over +/-4.00
  • If there is more than 5.00D difference between each eye 

However, if you are unsure, just call or email our team and we will confirm this with you.

Contact Lenses

How do I get a copy of my prescription?

The optician is legally obliged to provide you with a copy of your prescription after your eye test. If they don’t give you this, make sure you ask them.

How recent does my prescription have to be?

Your prescription must be no older than two years. Your recommended intervals between eye tests vary depending on your age and health.

Can I use my glasses prescription to order contact lenses from you?

Unfortunately not. Contact lenses work differently to glasses - you will have separate eye tests for contact lenses and for glasses, so your prescriptions will vary. 

Understanding your prescription

  1. ‘Base Curve’ determines the curvature of the lens.
  2. ‘Diameter’ is the diameter of the lens (always in mm).
  3. ‘Power’ will show whether you are short sighted (-) or long sighted (+) in each eye. A higher number means a stronger prescription. 
  4. If you have astigmatism (when the front part of the eye, the cornea, is the shape of a rugby ball instead of a regular circle), there will be a ‘Cylinder’ option which can be negative or positive and measures the amount of astigmatism you have. There will also be an ‘Axis’ option which will be between 1 and 180 which describes the curve in your eye.